Ann Blanton Let's talk health, fitness, nutrition and everything in between

Archive for August 2012

Good Heart Health

You already know that all nuts are good for your health, but when it comes to heart health, the walnut stands out above all the rest. Like all nuts, they have no cholesterol, few carbohydrates and are low in sodium. While they’re great for baking, make fabulous snacks and complement salads, they’re also high in calories and fat, so eating them in moderation is key.

Protect Your Heart

The unsaturated fats that are found in this heart smart nut, both monounsaturated and polyunsaturated are considered “good” fats and can lower LDL, (bad cholesterol) levels, thus, while boosting HDL, (good cholesterol), levels. It’s important to replace unhealthy saturated fats and incorporate walnuts as part of a healthy well-balanced diet. In comparison to other nuts, it only takes about seven walnuts to obtain the benefits from this regal nut.

Omega 3-fatty acids

The rich source of omega-3 fatty acids that are found in walnuts, decrease the risk of heart irregularities, plaque build-up and sudden death. They also contain large quantities of manganese and copper. Manganese is a mineral found in trace amounts in the human body, typically in the bones, liver, pancreas and kidneys. They also have important enzymes and antioxidants that help to fight free radical damage.

Lowering Cholesterol Properties

“Omega-3 fats directly control the size of LDL cholesterol particles in addition to oxidation properties that make the particles less cohesive, reducing the possibility to cause plaque. C-reactive protein (CRP) is noted to be a risk factor for heart disease and other heart problems,” says certified sports nutritionist, Lawrence Sanchez. “Walnuts can lower the risk by increasing the elasticity of arteries, thus reduce inflammation. What’s more, the omega 3’s can also help reduce triglycerides,” he adds. 

Vitamins and Minerals

The vitamins and minerals that are found these succulent nuts are in abundance. Rich supplies include A, B6, C, E calcium, iron and zinc. There are also considerable amounts of potassium, magnesium, selenium, folate and thiamin.

Weight Management

Because this mouth-watering snack is high in fiber, protein and healthy fats, it can help to manage your weight, simply by satisfying your hunger for longer periods. It takes approximately a handful, (30 grams) to satisfy your cravings. The end result is usually eating less food during the day. Furthermore, maintaining a healthy weight can help to keep your heart strong and in good physical shape. This does not mean that a few walnuts will counteract with an unhealthy diet.

The latest studies show that a moderate intake of healthy fats can be the outcome of a successful and long-term weight loss plan.

Nutritional Value

Walnuts contain 185 calories for a one-ounce serving, 18.49 grams of fat, 3.89 carbohydrates and 4.23 grams of protein.

Are you protecting your heart by eating these delectable nuts?

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/ Currently, I’ve just had my first short story published as an anthology in a book titled, “Heartscapes”.

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Stretching for good health

Photo by RobW

http://www.flickr.com/photos/robwallace/738543661/sizes/o/

On Your Mark, Get Set, Stretch!

Are you like most people when they first begin to exercise? The morning after, you’re muscles are so sore, you can hardly roll out of bed. You feel as if you’ve already been kicked to the curb and the day hasn’t even started. If you haven’t already figured out the solution, I’ll tell you. The answer is stretching before and after your workout.

Gentle stretching prior to activity is beneficial to warm up cold muscles and helps to prevent pulled or torn muscles. The post workout stretch aids in recovery and avoids injury. Neglecting to do so can make a world of difference between sore muscles and fatigue or increased energy and stronger muscles. Stretching shapes the muscles, making them long and lean and removes the lactic acid.

Now that you understand the importance of stretching, let’s talk about some of the benefits. 

Improves flexibility and range of motion

As you age, simple everyday tasks such as tying your shoes or picking something up from off the floor can often become challenging. Regular stretching can elongate your muscles and make daily chores much easier to achieve.

Enhances circulation

Stretching promotes circulation of blood to the muscles and joints, which in turn bring nutrients to the cells and helps to remove waste. 

Develops good posture

Stretching helps keep your muscles from becoming tight and sore, which in turn, allows for better posture and fewer aches and pains.

Relieves stress, anxiety and fatigue

Tense muscles are often accompanied by stress. Stretching relaxes those muscles and brings you a sense of well-being and relief.

Decreases risk from injury

When your muscles and joints are tight, stretching before and after a workout, loosens and protects them from becoming painful after exercise.

Now that you know the advantages of stretching, let’s practice a few techniques.

Calf

This is the muscle that runs along the back of the lower leg. Stand at arm’s length from a wall. Put one foot behind the other. The right knee should be straight and the right heel positioned on the floor as you slowly bend the left leg forward. Always hold your back straight and your hips forward. 

Hamstring

Your hamstring runs along the back of your upper leg. Lie on the floor, placing one leg against the wall. Relax your heel alongside the wall and bend your knee slightly. Gently straighten your leg until you feel a stretch along the back of your thigh.

Quadriceps

The quads run along the front of your thigh. Standing next to a wall for support, gently grasp your ankle. Pull your heel up and back until you feel a stretch in the front of your thigh. Hold your stomach in tight and keep your knees together.

Shoulders

Bring your left arm above or below your elbow and hold gently. Repeat with your right arm.

Neck

Bend your head forward and gently to the left. Do the same thing on the right. Hold to a comfortable position.

Warm-up

Always prepare your body for what is about to come. Remember to stretch cold muscles to prevent your risk of injury. Don’t rush stretching. Take things slow and easy. 

Breathe

Never hold your breath! Inhale slowly as you begin your stretch and exhale as you complete it.

Cool down

The cool down is just as important as stretching because it gradually brings your heart rate down without shocking your body. It also helps to relax your muscles before stretching takes place. 

Tips:

1. If it hurts, don’t do it! Hold each stretch for at least thirty to sixty seconds. If you feel pain or discomfort, back off.

2. Never bounce while you’re stretching because it can cause injury to your muscle tissue.

3. If you have a chronic medical condition or an injury, seek medical advice from a professional. Modify stretching is always advisable.

4. If you don’t exercise regularly, take a few minutes to stretch your body every morning and again before going to bed to maintain flexibility.

5. Make a habit to stretch daily and your body will thank you.

I would love to hear your feedback, so send me all your comments.

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/ Currently, I just had my first short story titled, “Shattered Spirit”, published as an anthology in a book titled, “Heartscapes”.

 

It takes a lot of dedication and commitment, no matter what your age.

Photo by puck90

http://www.flickr.com/photos/puck90/3563817003/

I thought it would be a good idea to start posting some of my published articles on my blog. For those of you who are interested, you can read them here. “Mastering Metabolism”, was one of my first articles published. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it.

Mastering Metabolism

by Ann Blanton

If you want a metabolism that blasts through fat like a vehicle burns through fuel, you’ll have to eat more food and exercise in a certain way.

When foods are absorbed, they’re broken down into proteins, carbohydrates and fats, and then digested by the body. This allows the body to function, grow and repair itself.

Many individuals believe that their metabolism slows down with time. This is true, because people become more sedentary. Your metabolism naturally slows approximately five percent every 10 years. But, regardless of what pace your body’s metabolism has, good nutrition and exercise are necessary to keep your body in perfect balance.

You’ll notice a significant difference in your metabolic rate if you eat a healthy breakfast every day. “A healthy breakfast gives you energy to start your day, especially when taking in carbohydrates from cereal and fruit,” says registered nutritionist Geoffrey Axiak.

Consume most of your calories early in the day. If possible, make dinner your smallest meal. Doing this helps your body to process and burn food while you’re awake and moving around.

Water is the most important source of nourishment for your body. “Water before breakfast purifies the body and makes your metabolism more efficient,” explains Axiak.

Because water is the body’s lubricant, it flushes out toxins and keeps the kidneys functioning properly.

Foods such as celery, cabbage, brussel sprouts, broccoli and cauliflower are considered high-energy foods. “Fruits, especially grapefruits and apples, will boost your metabolism,” says Axiak. Whole grains such as brown rice, whole wheat bread, barley, oatmeal and popcorn also are high-energy foods.

Cardiovascular exercise is one way to stimulate your metabolism. It makes your body use more calories, because the large muscle groups need more calories to perform during your aerobic activity. When your body sees this increased need, it drives its energy need during regular activity. After weeks and months of requiring more energy, you may see results through increased fat loss.

“Resistance training can also increase your life expectancy because it increases your capabilities by keeping your joints, bones and muscles stronger for longer so you can do more of the things that make up living,” comments Jonathan Ross, 2010 Idea Personal Trainer of the Year. “Aerobic activity might save your life, but strength training makes it worth living.”

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/ Currently, I just had my first short story titled, “Shattered Spirits”, published as an anthology in a book titled, “Heartscapes”.

The Benefits of Probiotics

by Ann Blanton

We all crave more energy to help us get through our busy lives. When the body is functioning normally, it takes approximately eighty percent of your energy to digest and eliminate the foods that you eat. No wonder so many people are dragging around by the end of the day.

According to Webster’s dictionary, Probiotics is defined as, “usually dairy food or a dietary supplement containing live bacteria that replaces or adds to the beneficial bacteria normally present in the gastrointestinal tract.” Probiotics also mean “for life”, which is why studies have proven that taking Probiotics is as necessary as taking a multi-vitamin.

You probably already know that good health begins in the digestive tract. The human body consists of trillions of bacteria and microorganisms typically in the gut. Individuals need to continually refill the good bacteria in the abdomen to boost balance in the digestion. The body stays healthy when intestinal floras flourish.

Chronic or acute conditions such as poor digestion, obesity, urinary tract infections and IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) can become problematical if they’re not imbalanced. An overgrowth of the yeast fungus, also known as candidiasis, might also be a concern.

“Friendly” flora or “good” bacteria is found in the digestive tract, skin, mouth, rectum and the vagina. In other word, Probiotics keep our stomach, intestines and colon clean and healthy. It supports normal function of the colon, digestion, elimination of waste and prevents yeast, bacteria and parasites. When the “good” flora decreases, the “bad” bacteria and yeast take over. Once this happens, it throws the entire digestive tract off balance; causing the body to become prone to illness, Candida, yeast infection and digestive problems.

Frequently, antibiotics can also kill the “good” bacteria in the large intestine, which makes disease more susceptible. Physicians should always recommend Probiotics in combination while taking antibiotics.

Bad eating habits, chlorinated drinking water, stress, a low immune system, steroids and birth control pills are factors that can interrupt the healthy balance with the bacteria in the body.

Improves digestion 

In order for the body to fight off infection, improve digestion. elimination and boost the immune system, you might want to include Probiotics into your diet. By taking Probiotics, they also promote regularity and improve mineral absorption.

There are many sources of Probiotics available in pill form, capsule, liquid or powder. Foods that contain Probiotics include fermented products. Webster’s dictionary defines fermented as: “any of a group of living organisms, as yeasts, molds and certain bacteria that cause fermentation.”  Many of these products may already be included in your diet, such as sour cream, yogurt with live cultures and cultured buttermilk. It’s known that “good” bacteria in yogurt can help with diarrhea, gas and bloating. Those who are lactose intolerant and have difficulty digesting milk products, may find drinking acidophilus milk easier to tolerate.

Has this information been useful in learning the advantages thatProbiotics can provide?  What benefits have you gained?

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/ Currently, I’ve just had my first short story published as an anthology in a book titled, “Heartscapes”.