Ann Blanton Let's talk health, fitness, nutrition and everything in between

Posts Tagged ‘eggs

Free range chickens

Home, home on the range

Photo by: Brookford Farm

http://www.flickr.com/photos/brookfordfarm/4856788448/

Farm raised chickens vs. free range- what’s the difference?

by Ann Blanton

Farm raised

Have you ever noticed the yellow color of a chicken purchased at your local market? The reason behind this is because these birds have been raised where they can scarcely move, stretch or engage in normal behaviors. The overcrowded space is so limited, these poor chickens can barely flap their wings. Confided circumstances such as these put stress on chickens. When chickens are stressed, they naturally produce disease.

These birds have been raised in coops with other chickens that sit around in their own feces and have been injected with antibiotics and hormones. This hardly sounds appetizing right? No wonder people are concerned about the foods they eat and where it comes from. Consuming healthy protein is a major factor for a healthy lifestyle, eliminate disease and increase energy level.

Free range

This in itself is pretty self-explanatory. It simply means these little guys are free to roam. They’re not raised in chicken houses like farm raised birds; they’re not diseased because they don’t sit in their own feces or the feces of other chickens. Unlike there farm raised friends who live six weeks, free range chickens live, approximately eight weeks longer. A diet for a free-range bird consists of natural grass, grains and seeds, and are not addicted to drugs.

Beware 

Be cautious of farmers who say there hens are free-range. If their diet consists of corn, soy and synthetics, they are not free-range. 

Which eggs are best?

Considering the conditions of the farm raised hens, eggs produced from free-range chickens are naturally healthier, more nutritious and are much healthier for the planet.

Nutritional facts:

Approximately free range eggs contain 1/3 less cholesterol, 1/4 less saturated fat, 2/3 more vitamin A, twice as many omega-3-fatty acids,  triple the amount of vitamin E, 7 times more beta carotene and as much as 6 times more vitamin D.

Remember, the answer may differ depending on the farms.

Tip:

When thawing a chicken, do so on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator.  By applying this helpful tip, you can prevent salmonella from spreading. Placing a chicken on the top shelf will allow the juices to drip on the lower shelves, which can spread salmonella to other food items.

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/ I’ve also had my first short story published as anthology in a book titled, “Heartscapes”.

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Nutritous fruits and vegetables

Nutritious fruits and vegetables

Photo by: starleigh

http://www.flickr.com/photos/starleigh/100301383/sizes/l/

 

Good Nutrition for Adults

by Ann Blanton

Your body is the only home that you’ll truly ever own. Treat it like the temple that it is!

The first step to a healthy lifestyle is a well balanced nutritious diet. It doesn’t matter how old you are, if you want to live a life free from diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and most types of cancer, you need to get on the right track and learn healthy nutritional habits. If you have good eating habits, you can save yourself a lot of time visiting the doctor’s office.

People who eat healthy have a higher immune system than someone who has poor eating habits. Proper nutrition and a healthy immune system will keep you strong throughout your entire life time. Your immune system can be affected by many things such as environmental pollutants, pesticides, antibiotics, allergies, inflammation, and chronic fatigue. Healing can take place much sooner with a strong immune system. However, the only way this is impossible is by having proper nutritional health.

Try making small adjustments weekly and cut back on foods that you know can be harmful to your health. Add at least two healthy food items to your shopping list and always stock up on fruits and vegetables. It’s essential to include at least five fruits and veggies into your diet every day. Get rid of all temptation and leave the comfort foods behind. Have you ever heard the saying, “out of sight, out of mind?” Well it’s true; if it’s not in the pantry then you won’t be tempted.

Carbohydrates 

Many foods have carbohydrates and are an excellent source of energy for your body. Learn the difference between the carbohydrates that are good for you versus the ones that are not. If you eat too many carbohydrates at once, it can cause your glucose level to be too high.

Good carbohydrates that are loaded with fiber 

1. Fresh fruits and vegetables in every color, shape and size

2. Whole grains such as brown rice, whole wheat bread and crackers, oatmeal and cereal

3. Dried peas, legumes and lentils. (These are also a great source of protein).

4. Non-fat or low fat dairy items such as milk, cheese, yogurt and margarine. Cook and bake with egg whites or egg substitutes

5. Wheat pasta, wheat flour and sweet potatoes

Carbohydrates to avoid

1. White bread

2. White rice and pasta

3. Fruit juices with sweeteners

4. Cakes, cookies, candy and chips

5. Regular soda

Good sources of protein

1. Lean meats and poulty without the skin

2. Low fat cheese, yogurt and eggs

3. Natural peanut butter and soy products such as tofu

4. Fish

Healthy fats are also heart healthy

1.  Nuts, almonds, walnuts and seeds

2. Fish such as salmon, tuna and mackerel

3. Avocados

4. Olive oil

You don’t have to avoid foods that you crave altogether, just eat them in moderation.

 

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/ I’ve also had my first short story published titled, “Shattered Spirit”, as an anthology in a book titled, “Heartscapes”.

I always appreicate all your comments.

 

Foods with vitamin DMost of the time, it’s a good idea to use sunscreen, but it’s okay to enjoy the sun’s rays for about ten minutes without it. By getting a good dose of vitamin D and then slathering on the sunscreen, you get both benefits.

Also referred to as the “sunshine” vitamin, vitamin D is fat-soluble, which means it’s stored in the body and can be made naturally. Two other forms such as D2 and D3 are also important.

We depend on what we eat, the sun and taking a multivitamin to supply us with enough vitamin D; unfortunately, the sun is not always readily available to everyone.

Studies prove that by taking this supplement, you can prevent breast and colon cancer by cutting the risk by fifty-percent. What’s more, you can decrease the possibilities of other types of cancer such as skin, colon, and prostrate, when taking vitamin D. Autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis can also be prevented.

Dosage

Depending on your age will depend on how much vitamin D you should be taking. This is because the older you are, the less vitamin D your skin will produce. Adult males, females and pregnant and lactating women under the age of fifty should take 200 units, fifty to seventy years of age should take 400 units and those over the age of seventy should consume 600 units. Children from birth to five years, should be consuming 200 units every day.

Foods

Dietary sources that include vitamin D include: fortified milk, salmon, tuna, sardines, eggs and cod liver oil. Fruits and vegetables are another good source of vitamin D. In fact, it’s almost impossible to get optimal levels from the foods that you eat. You’d have to eat at least two or three servings of salmon or sardines, drink five glasses of milk and take a spoonful of cod liver oil and that still wouldn’t be sufficient.

Benefits

This wonder supplement has been known to control blood pressure, reduce stress and tension and reduce spasms that are caused from aches and pains. It also helps fight depression, improves skin health and increases cardiovascular strength.

Vitamin D Deficient

This is common if you live in a place where sun exposure is infrequent or if you’re housebound. Signs that may occur are: muscle pain, depression, mood swings, fractures, low energy, fatigue and sleep irregularities.

Prevention

A good way to prevent vitamin D deficiency is by limited unprotected sun exposure, take a good quality multivitamin along with vitamin D and eat a diet that is rich in whole foods. If you’re someone who’s fortunate enough to live where there’s plenty of sunshine, get out and enjoy the rays. If not, then you might consider taking it in supplement form. So, how do you get your dose of vitamin D?

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/ I’ll also have my first creative story published as an anthology in a book titled,  “Heartscapes”, in a few short weeks.