Ann Blanton Let's talk health, fitness, nutrition and everything in between

Posts Tagged ‘metabolism

Weight Loss Boss

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Weight Management – Why women gain weight

by Ann Blanton 

If you’re someone who gets frustrated or discouraged every time you step on the scale, you’re not alone. Every day weighing can sabotage you from accomplishing your weight loss goals, so you might want to limit yourself from getting on that pesky contraception.

First, it’s important to know that daily weighing is not required. There are many causes why the numbers on the scale increase rather than decrease. Let’s discuss what some of those reasons are.

Sodium

Salt does not make you gain fat. Why? Because it contains no calories. Yet, weight gain is certainly a temporary possibility if consumptions are too high. This is simply because it causes your body to retain water. The body naturally tries to eliminate extreme amounts by diluting it with water. Then again, weight loss is more likely if your consumption is too low. For this reason, it removes water. Foods that are highly processed are more likely to have higher contents of sodium.

Glycogen

I like to think of glycogen as a tank that’s filled with stored carbohydrates. On any given day, if you fail to take in  adequate amounts of carbohydrates, your glycogen supply will diminish. When this happens, your appetite could slightly increase; and your body will replace its fuel with water. It’s not uncommon to experience shifts in water weight up to approximately two pounds daily without changing your activity level or calorie consumption.

Muscle

If you’ve been including weight training along with cardiovascular activity into your daily routine, don’t be alarmed if you see increased weight gain.  Long lean muscle has positive effects on the body for many reasons. It boosts metabolism, protects the bones against disease such as osteoporosis by preventing bone loss, gives you with a sexy physique and provides confidence by increasing your self- esteem.  What’s more, if you don’t use it you’ll lose it.

Menstruation 

Let’s take a moment to talk about why weight fluctuations are often a result of menstruation. Fluid retention or edema is frequently the culprit during this time of the month, because hormonal changes are usually taking place. At this time, some women experience difficulty with bowel movement that can also lead to water retention.

During the pre-menstrual cycle, magnesium levels typically plummet. When this happens, it creates a lower production of insulin levels. As the levels drop, sugar cravings take place.  Most often, the end result is  weight gain.

Peri–Menopause  and Menopause 

Weight gain often becomes a problem for women who are approaching the years of peri-menopause and menopause, particularly around the mid section. Although a hormonal imbalance takes place for many women, hormones alone are not entirely the problem. The difference between genetics and lifestyle principles are also linked. Along with the aging process, metabolism clearly slows down and muscle mass begins to decline. Failure to do something about this, your body composition will change from a reduced amount of muscle to additional fat.

Sleep Deprivation

Sleep deprivation can often be the cause of many negative effects  on the body. Lack of sleep decreases your energy level, affects motivation to exercise and often results in eating more than what’s normally required for the body. Little or no sleep causes a rise in ghrelin; the hormone that stimulates the appetite. So, if you’re not dropping those few extra pounds, perhaps you’re not getting enough shut- eye.

Stress 

Let’s face it, stress is a way of life! With today’s economy, who wouldn’t be stressed. Acute stress may lead to appetite loss, whereas, chronic stress may enhance appetite. Prolonged stress triggers the hormone cortisol by releasing it into the body. When this happens, it affects metabolism; it can also lead to depression, sleep deprivation and obesity. The best way to reduce stress is through physical activity.

Hypothyroidism 

The tiny butterfly gland located in the middle of the neck can wreak havoc on the entire body if it’s not controlled. Hypothyroidism (underactive), is an autoimmune disease that affects the thyroid by not producing enough of the hormone, T4 (thyroxine). When levels become low, it instantly signals the brain and tells the thyroid to release more T4. When this happens, if affects the metabolic rate which in turn affects the body to burn fat, as a result, unexpected weight gain.

Medications

It’s not uncommon for certain types of prescription medications to cause weight gain. This is because some medications can increase appetite, quench your thirst for sugary drinks, increase water retention and reduce the ability to burn fat. If this is a concern and you experience these side effects, you might want to talk to your health care professional.

So, what do you think,  is it true, does the scale really lie? The next time you step onto the scale, take all these facts into consideration.

Stop by often. I always appreciate your comments.

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. I’ve also had my first short story published as an anthology in a book titled, “Heartscape”. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/

Women walking

You can look and feel good at any age

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FIT AND FABULOUS OVER FIFTY

Have you ever wondered why your sister in her fifties who leads a physically active lifestyle, looks forty something? What about your forty-year old best friend who has no physical activity and looks fifty?

With regular exercise, you can actually reverse the signs of aging by at least ten years. You no longer have to settle for that tummy bulge, arms that wave back and that sagging rear view. You can look just as attractive walking away as you do walking into a room. Now if that doesn’t get you motivated, nothing will.

Today, baby boomers have tossed all those excuses not to exercise out with yesterday’s trash. Studies show that baby boomers are becoming fit and active at fifty and beyond and are in the best shape of their lives.

Typically, when a person reaches a certain age, they’ve learned to accept most of their imperfections. Maybe you’ve made a promise to yourself to be in good shape by the time you hit the  big 5-0. Unfortunately, things don’t always turn out the way we plan. As we age, it’s more difficult to remain physically active.

Getting in shape has many benefits. It makes you look and feel better, gives you more energy, helps fight against cardiovascular disease, diabetes and even some types of cancer. It also helps you sleep better and improves your sex drive. When you feel confident about yourself, you feel more attractive. The possibilities are endless.

With that said, let’s explore other fundamentals that can help you stay healthy for many years to come.

Muscle Toning – There are a number of reasons why you should build strong beautiful muscles with strength training. Building muscle increases your metabolism, enhances energy, keeps your body in perfect balance, keeps your bones in ailment, supports your skeleton and burns calories at rest.

Fitness club owner Dan Neal, focuses mostly on baby boomers and the quality of life. Neal says, “As a person ages, the importance of muscle toning is a necessary factor because the older you become, the more muscle you lose. Toning keeps you stronger, more vibrant and helps to prevent injuries.”

Stretching – It’s just as important to stretch before and after a workout as it is to do the actual workout itself. Failure to stretch can make it difficult to achieve simple daily activities such as putting on your shoes or reaching for something on a shelf.  Lack of stretching can also cause muscle tightness, soreness and injury. A good way to improve flexibility is by doing a series of stretching exercises daily. According to Neal, stretching improves stiff joints as well as strengthens the stabilizer muscles.

Balance – You can learn balance techniques by practicing yoga. Balance building exercises are important so you can react in certain situations to prevent falling or breaking a hip.

Watch what you eat – It’s essential to learn the difference between which fats are healthy versus which ones are unhealthy. “Nuts, seeds, whole grains, beans and avocados are examples of good fats,” says licensed nutritionist, Patricia Harris. “Cakes, cookies, candy and soft drinks are a few examples of foods that contain empty calories so it’s important to avoid these foods,” states Harris.

In terminology, empty calories are described as foods that are high in energy, but low in vitamins, minerals, fiber and nutrients. That’s not to say that you have to eliminate these foods altogether, just enjoy them in moderation.

Because of the low quantities of sugar in fruits and vegetables such as strawberries, grapefruits, melons, oranges, broccoli, cauliflower and mushrooms, these foods keep you feeling full and satisfied longer.

So, if you’ve hit that important milestone or you know someone who has, it’s never too late to get in shape and stay fit and active for a lifetime.

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/ Recently, I just had my first short story titled, “Shattered Spirit”, published as an anthology, in “Heartscapes”.

It takes a lot of dedication and commitment, no matter what your age.

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I thought it would be a good idea to start posting some of my published articles on my blog. For those of you who are interested, you can read them here. “Mastering Metabolism”, was one of my first articles published. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it.

Mastering Metabolism

by Ann Blanton

If you want a metabolism that blasts through fat like a vehicle burns through fuel, you’ll have to eat more food and exercise in a certain way.

When foods are absorbed, they’re broken down into proteins, carbohydrates and fats, and then digested by the body. This allows the body to function, grow and repair itself.

Many individuals believe that their metabolism slows down with time. This is true, because people become more sedentary. Your metabolism naturally slows approximately five percent every 10 years. But, regardless of what pace your body’s metabolism has, good nutrition and exercise are necessary to keep your body in perfect balance.

You’ll notice a significant difference in your metabolic rate if you eat a healthy breakfast every day. “A healthy breakfast gives you energy to start your day, especially when taking in carbohydrates from cereal and fruit,” says registered nutritionist Geoffrey Axiak.

Consume most of your calories early in the day. If possible, make dinner your smallest meal. Doing this helps your body to process and burn food while you’re awake and moving around.

Water is the most important source of nourishment for your body. “Water before breakfast purifies the body and makes your metabolism more efficient,” explains Axiak.

Because water is the body’s lubricant, it flushes out toxins and keeps the kidneys functioning properly.

Foods such as celery, cabbage, brussel sprouts, broccoli and cauliflower are considered high-energy foods. “Fruits, especially grapefruits and apples, will boost your metabolism,” says Axiak. Whole grains such as brown rice, whole wheat bread, barley, oatmeal and popcorn also are high-energy foods.

Cardiovascular exercise is one way to stimulate your metabolism. It makes your body use more calories, because the large muscle groups need more calories to perform during your aerobic activity. When your body sees this increased need, it drives its energy need during regular activity. After weeks and months of requiring more energy, you may see results through increased fat loss.

“Resistance training can also increase your life expectancy because it increases your capabilities by keeping your joints, bones and muscles stronger for longer so you can do more of the things that make up living,” comments Jonathan Ross, 2010 Idea Personal Trainer of the Year. “Aerobic activity might save your life, but strength training makes it worth living.”

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/ Currently, I just had my first short story titled, “Shattered Spirits”, published as an anthology in a book titled, “Heartscapes”.

The Best Time to Exercise

The best time to exercise is the time that’s most beneficial for you. If it’s convenient, stick to a schedule. By doing this, exercise will become a habit and not a chore. Regardless of when you exercise, you’ll accomplish the same benefits.

Many people focus on morning exercise because that’s when their energy level is the highest, they’re well rested, more focused and it jump starts their metabolism and keeps it that way for hours. When your metabolism is elevated, you naturally burn more calories. It also puts you in a positive mood because you’re doing something that’s good for yourself. Exercise in the a.m., is easier for many to make exercise a part of their daily routine.

What do you do if you want to work out, but there’s not enough time to fit exercise into your hectic schedule because of work, school, taking care of the kids or other obligations? I’ll share how I manage to fit exercise into my busy schedule and I hope you pass some of your ideas on to me too. For as long as I can remember, I’ve always been a morning exerciser. Every day at the same time, I tie up my sneakers and workout. Eventually it naturally became a habit. If something unexpected comes up and I can’t get my morning workout in as planned, I try to reschedule later in the day.

Then again, some people prefer to exercise in the afternoon or evening because it’s a good stress buster from all the pressures of the day. Muscles are also more flexible and it’s easier to find a friend to work out with. Plus, your body temperature is at its peak and injuries are less likely.

Exercising in the evening works for many, but be careful because your cortisol levels are at their highest in the evenings, and exercising to close to bedtime can make it difficult to fall asleep.

Everyone has their own opinion what works best for them. So what time works best for you? Are you a morning exerciser like myself, or do you work out in the afternoons or late at night? If you’re an evening exerciser, does it interfere with your sleep habits? If so,  how do you handle it?

I’ve had many articles published at Fitness Plus Magazine. Here’s the link to view them if you want to check them out. http://fitplusmag.com/magazine/author/annblanton/

I will also have my first short story published as an anthology in a book called “Heartscapes”, in a few short weeks.